Tag: thriller

La cara oculta, 2011

La Cara Oculta, or The Hidden Face, is simply one of the best movies I have ever seen. Screenwriter and director Andrés Baiz brings this unique accomplishment to the screen, telling the story of a Spanish orchestra director named Adrián (Quim Gutiérrez) who comes home from a rehearsal to find a video from his girlfriend Belén (Clara Lago) telling him that she’s leaving him. He watches the video a number of times with no idea where she’s gone. A police investigation leads nowhere, though they suspect Adrián of being involved in her disappearance.

Eventually he processes the loss and moves on with his life. He starts dating a waitress named Fabiana (Martina García) that he meets one night when out drinking heavily. Their relationship progresses and Fabiana moves in. It’s then that spooky things start to happen around the house that seem to haunt Fabiana. The conclusion to all of this is some of the finest film-making I’ve seen since at least 2000.

The story is filled with surprises; just when the viewer thinks they’ve figured out what’s going on, everything changes. The twists in the plot are frequent, but not overwhelming. It is an astonishingly beautiful movie and the care with which it was created is evident in the quality of the finished product. To me, the most mysterious thing about The Hidden Face is that garnered so little attention and wasn’t nominated for any awards. I can’t recommend strongly enough that you watch this movie at your earliest convenience, especially if you liked movies such as The Usual SuspectsMemento, or even The Secret in Their Eyes.

 

Eastern Promises, 2007

Eastern Promises directed by David Cronenberg is a 2007 story that focuses strongly on the intricacies of life in a Russian mafia family. It tells the story of a young British nurse named Anna (Naomi Watts) who comes across an orphaned baby, a discovery that threatens the patriarch (Armin Mueller-Stahl) of a London-based Russian crime syndicate. Viggo Mortensen plays a Russian driver named Nikolai, appearing on-screen with extensive and detailed criminal tattoos covering much of his body; the effect was reportedly so realistic that one day after filming he frightened people at a local bar because the tattoos were visible.

When Anna discovers a diary kept by a young woman named Tatiana, who is connected with the Russian family, it endangers both her life and that of the infant’s. It is revealed that what likely happened was the Russian patriarch’s son Kirill (Vincent Cassel) fathered the child after raping Tatiana; surrounding the dramatic story is the life of Nikolai as he attempts to ascend into ever higher levels of the mafia family.

The acting is of the highest caliber and, as expected, Cronenberg’s direction is nearly flawless. The twin plots of the film complement each other well and the realism is said to be extremely accurate. Mortensen spent time with Russian convicts to learn about their culture and how extensive tattooing often tells the life story of Russian criminals. The supporting cast leaves nothing to be desired and the pace of the movie leaves the viewer clutching the arms of their chairs with tension as the stories race to their thrilling conclusion. Eastern Promises may not have the mind-warping changes found in his earlier films, but in this reviewer’s opinion, it is still one of the three best pictures he has ever directed. What more is there to say? Now that you know a movie of this quality awaits you there is only one thing left to do: go watch it!

Luftslottet som sprängde, 2009

Luftslottet som sprängde, or The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, continues the story of Lisbeth Salander (Noomi Rapace) and Mikael Blomqvist (Michael Nyqvist). This third and final installment picks up immediately following the conclusion of The Girl Who Played with Fire, Lisbeth is now hospitalized for her wounds and being detained by the Swedish police for the murders of a researcher working for Millenium magazine and his fiance.

Her father, Alexander Zalachenko (Georgi Staykov), is also hospitalized and in the same hospital as Salander. He wants the Swedish intelligence faction which has kept him hidden and protected for so many years to kill Salander, threatening to give up the organizations secrets if they do not comply. Salander’s brother (Micke Spreitz) remains at-large, though he is wanted for the murders of police officers killed during his escape from Zalachenko’s estate.

Salander’s long history of maltreatment at the hands of the Swedish state continues here and much of the movie continues the combined efforts of Salander, her associated hacker Plague (Tomas Köhler), Blomqvist, and Blomqvist’s sister (Annika Hallin), who acts as attorney for Salander in this case.

Once more, the work of director Daniel Alfredson is phenomenal in bringing the story from Stieg Larsson‘s novel of the same title to life on the big screen. With its superb acting, writing and pace, the story of Salander’s fight against the Swedish state that has taken so much from her and abused her for so long finally becomes the primary focus of the story. The viewer if given a lot of new information about her early life, which makes her efforts to clear her name – aided by both her doctor and attorney all the more compelling. In addition to their help, Salander is assisted by friends and associates to not only prove her innocence, but to prove she deserves a completely independent life. All of this, which occurs at a breakneck pace, keeps viewers on the edge of their seat until the ultimate finale.

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest is an incredibly satisfying conclusion to its two predecessors, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and The Girl Who Played with Fire, and is too good to spoil with this review. If you have seen the two preceding movies in this series and have not yet seen The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest you should do so at your earliest opportunity as you will not be disappointed!

The Escapist, 2008

Frank Perry (Brian Cox) is a long-time convict in an Irish prison where he is ultimately meant to live out the remainder of his life. Things for him change when he learns that his daughter is having problems with drugs and he decides he must escape from prison and try to mend his relationship with her, hoping that in the process he will be able to help her stop her drug abuse. To allow this escape he enlists help from a variety of other convicts, each bringing some skill, knowledge, or other asset to help achieve their common goal of escape.

What appears at first glance to a simple movie with an almost cookie cutter plot delves into ever deeper levels of meaning, symbolism and mental states, depending heavily upon the great skill of the supporting cast.

Aside from the guards, Frank must respect the political arrangements within the prison, which revolve around a drug trade, managed by Viv Batista (Seu Jorge) and overseen by the main power within the prison, a flatly menacing inmate played exceptionally well by the now A-list actor Damian Lewis. Others join the group as the plot becomes more and more complicated, culminating in a race through the underground structures sitting beneath the prison.

So much can be said about the quality of the acting and the depth that is developed by writer/director Rupert Wyatt; from the initially simple story unfolds what can best be described as an exceptionally elegant film. The web of characters is woven with impressive skill and the movie takes on complexity and levels of meaning that are not expected from the initial framing of the plot.

Any viewer who likes good, character-driven stories will likely appreciate this movie and it is highly regarded and recommended by this reviewer.

Trance, 2013

Trance by Danny Boyle is a remarkable film with few flaws, it contains a mind-bending series of twists that leave the viewer guessing throughout, guesses that are only answered in the final scene.  James McAvoy stars as Simon, an auctioneer in London, that is robbed by a gang lead by Franck (Vincent Cassel), secretly aided from inside the auction house by Simon. It later emerges that for reasons unknown to him Simon has removed the stolen painting and forgotten where it is hidden.

Franck’s gang decides to try hypnotherapy to aid Simon’s memory using a therapist named Elizabeth (Rosario Dawson) and from there the movie quickly picks up momentum. Boyle’s usual visual appeal is present, especially during the sequences taking place only in peoples’ minds. The effects are so effective they are nearly unnoticeable by the viewer, which is always a good sign.

Throughout her sessions with Simon, Elizabeth probes his mind and a series of memories best described as Inception-esque is uncovered with many levels that are, at first confusing, but simultaneously thrilling and enticing. The frequent sessions and resulting exploration of the memories cover many levels, leaving viewers guessing about the root the memories and thus, the truth of the matter about the painting and Simon himself.

McAvoy, Dawson, and Cassel are phenomenal in their roles and the supporting actors leave nothing to be desired. The movie only suffers when compared with Inception and from some subtle pacing problems in the middle – aside from that, it is a delightful, action-filled romp through the memories and minds of the characters, leading to a fantastic conclusion, – one which perfectly resolves the film by the time the credits roll. Trance can be recommended in the strongest possible terms for virtually any audience.